The Bamyan Foundation in collaboration with ROYA-Resources of Young Afghans is committed to help the following six children of impoverished backgrounds to obtain a high school education. ROYA local coordinators in Kabul, Asif Rasooly and Shoaib Mehryar, identified these six child laborers and helped them to gain admission to Tarbyat High School.  For more information about the children, please see their biographies below (also see the kids with Tarbyat High School principal in the above picture). 

Winter Session:

In preparation for the new school year which begins in late March, the children are attending winter session classes at Tarbyat High School. Four of the children are in a special remedial class that will help them to catch up with their same-age peers when the new school year begins. The other two children are stronger academically and have been placed in winter classes with their peers. The cost for the winter session for the six children is $469.50 including books and transportation. Bamyan Foundation is covering a portion of said amount.

Academic Year 2017:

The local coordinators in Kabul (Shoaib and Asif) and director of the ROYA Mentorship Program made the decision to transfer the students to the Pegah Private High School where they could attend special classes specifically for their academic level. As a result of attending an extremely weak governmental school in one of the poorest sections of Western Kabul and being child laborers, they are behind in their studies. Izathullah is the only student who is performing at his grade level and is now a member of the regular 9th grade class at Pegah. The other seven students have joined grades 1, 3, 4 and 5 depending on their abilities and will study two grades during the regular academic year and one grade during the 3-month winter session. Pegah has a strong reputation and is eager to collaborate with ROYA and the Bamyan Foundation. The total cost of tuition, books, uniforms and transportation for these eight children to attend the Pegah Private High School is $1,410 for the 2017 academic year.

The Bamyan Foundation has covered the cost for 2017 academic year, and is committed to provide support to these resilient children until they graduate High School.

Academic Year 2018:

We have began our fundraising campaign for 2018 academic year.  Our goal is to raise $20,000 by February 28, 2018 to offer full and partial scholarships to students in our partner schools - Marefat, Baba and ROYA. 


Children of Chaman Ali:

Ezathullah

Ezathullah

Ezathullah is 15 years old and in 8th grade. He is the oldest of five children. He is a former street worker - selling ice cream or selling the smoke from 'spand' (wards off evil spirits). He is in his third semester of English classes through the ROYA Mentorship Program and has been a position holder in each semester. He aspires to be a doctor and is eager to learn English to improve his skills and his other studies. Attending the Tarbyat Private School will enable him to develop his talents in the best possible way. You can read an interview with Ezath here: http://star.edu.af/rising-from-the-ashes/

 

 

 

Amina

Amina

Amina is 11 years old and in 4th grade. She has three brothers and one sister (in her arms). Her father collects and sells old metal. Until August 2016, she was weaving carpets after school to help support her family. Her goal is to become a teacher after her university studies. She is eager to study in a good school and was very enthusiastic when she learned of this opportunity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rahmat

Rahmat

Rahmat is the youngest participant in the ROYA Mentorship Program at only 8 years old. He is the middle of five children. His father collects and sells old metal and his mother weaves carpets, but they earn very little money. Until July Rahmat was selling the smoke from an herb called 'spand' from a tin can on congested, polluted Kabul streets. He had been a child laborer since he was 5 years old. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hamid is seven years old. He is the fourth of five children. His three older siblings were child laborers until joining the ROYA Mentorship Program. Hamid's father collects, buys and sells old metal. The family lives in one of the poorest areas of Western Kabul and the local government school is extremely weak. Attending a private school will help Hamid to develop the skills he will need to escape the poverty that has trapped his family.


Children of Mohammad Hassan:

Rahmatullah

Rahmatullah

Rahmatullah was a 15-year-old child street worker. He is in 5th grade and wants to be a civil engineer. He suffers from a parasitic disease called Leishmaniasis (the sore on his nose) that is prevalent in the disadvantaged, overpopulated and remote area of Western Kabul where he lives. He is under treatment and we hope it is cured soon. He is the third of seven children. He wants to learn English and study in a better school because he believes it will help him to break the cycle of poverty in his family and "build [his] own future."

 
Zainab

Zainab is 14 years old and was forced to leave school in 6th grade. She stayed home and did carpet weaving with her mother. Her family would not allow her to be in the ROYA Mentorship Program because they didn't feel she needed to be in school beyond 6th grade. They let us take her younger sister and her 15-year-old brother. Recently they agreed to let Zainab return to school and participate in our program. Now she studies 7th grade at the Tarbyat Private School, smiles regularly and feels empowered.

 

 

 
Fatima

Fatima

Fatima is 10 years old and was a carpet weaver until August when she entered the ROYA Mentorship Program. She is the fifth of seven children and lives in an extremely poor section of western Kabul. Her father is a karachiwan (someone who pushes a wheelbarrow for hire) and her mother is a carpet weaver. She wishes to be a doctor in the future.

 

Mohammad Ali is eight years old and has four brothers and two sisters. His two years of studies at the local governmental school in his very poor neighborhood have been of little use. Attending a private school will help him tremendously. He is the first child in his family who is not a child laborer and his only job will be to study and do well in school. His father is a day laborer with unsteady employment. His two oldest brothers also work to help support the family.